Avoiding The Toxic Metals That Block Production of Your Thyroid Hormones.

thyroid-toxic-metals

We live in a world full of toxins, harsh chemicals, and harmful heavy metals. Fortunately, there are ways that you can avoid a large number of the ones that block the production of your thyroid hormones. Common heavy metals we are all exposed to include mercury, lead, aluminum, arsenic, and cadmium. These metals can be toxic even in small amounts.

How Do Toxins Block Your Thyroid?

Some toxins block your hormone receptors and can change the way your thyroid produces hormones and even block the conversion of the inactive hormone T4 into the active hormone T3.  Some can prevent hormone production all together. Others affect the way cells in your body receive hormones, causing thyroid resistance, much like insulin-resistant diabetes. Toxic halides, such as chlorine and flouride, compete for the iodine your thyroid needs leaving your thyroid depleted or non-functioning.

When Good Metals Become Toxic

Some important metals such as zinc, copper, and iron are needed by your body, but they become toxic in large amounts. Too much of any metal, even an important one, can lead to poisoning.

In other instances, if your levels of good metals are low, such as zinc, your body will use toxic metals in its place. Toxic metals can keep your body functioning when vital minerals are low, but when they accumulate in your body, can lead to hypothyroidism.

Where Do Toxic Metals Come From?

We all have some level of toxic metals in our bodies. You are at higher risk if you live close to industrial plants or are exposed to polluted air and water. You breathe toxins, ingest them, or absorb them through your skin. Some examples include,

Car exhaust
Pesticide and fertilizer use
Dental fillings
Paints
Inks
Cigarette smoke
Aluminum cooking pots
Non-stick cooking surfaces
Vaccines
Light bulbs
Fire retardants used in clothing or bedding
Skin cream
Deodorants
Fish

What Should You Do

You can have your heavy metals levels tested in different labs around the country. Blood tests are good for measuring iron levels; however, other metals concentrate in tissues and are not well read in your blood. Most metals can be measured by hair,  fingernail analysis or urine testing. These tests are a much more accurate measure of the level of heavy metals in your body.

If you’re suffering from headaches, brain fog, and fatigue, and your tests indicate high levels of heavy metals, find a healthcare professional experienced in removing heavy metals from your body.


Dr. Jeda Boughton is a doctor of Chinese medicine in Vancouver BC, Canada, and the founder of the Natural Thyroid Health Program. She teaches women who suffer from thyroid disorders how to heal naturally through alternative medicine.

Jeda Boughton – who has written posts on Natural Thyroid Health.


{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Colette July 21, 2015 at 2:25 am

This youtube clip is great information Jeda and horrible at the same time. Thanks for sending it through. I plan on changing a lot of things to help my immune system improve as I now know it is connected to hypothyroidism

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